The Greening of Psychoanalysis

In a paper written in 2011 for the Revue Française de Psychanalyse, André Green (2011b) traces the trajectory of his own work in his quest to understand the borderline patient—from the book On Private Madness (which in the French edition was subtitled: “Psychoanalysis of Borderline States”) to his last book, Illusions and Disillusions of Psychoanalytic Work . In the first, the concept of the death instinct had not been mentioned. In-between the two books lies the nine-hour weekend seminar given by Green in Paris on the death instinct, published under the title: Pourquoi les pulsions de destruction ou de mort?

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Exploring the Family and Couple State of Mind

 

The psychoanalytic treatment of families and couples has long been relegated to second class status, thought by psychoanalysts to be a lesser, distant cousin of “the real deal” of individual analysis. But there are many of us who feel that psychoanalysis is first and foremost a working theory, a set of ideas towards understanding the human condition, and then, secondarily, a set of applications to various modes of therapy – individual analytic therapy done mostly once or twice weekly, intensive psychoanalysis usually employing the couch with a frequency of three to five times a week – and family and couple psychoanalysis (or psychoanalytic therapy), along with a number of other equally important applications such as group analysis. All these are legitimate modes of application of psychoanalysis.

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